Communities boost nonprofit energy sustainability

More nonprofits are benefiting from solar power than ever before. Today, we look at one approach to increasing access to clean, reliable energy for nonprofits of all stripes.

West Virginia’s Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church installed 60 solar panels that will lower its overheads, enhance its sustainability, and power the church for about half of the year. How much did it cost the church? $1.

About 100 households in the community joined a “water heater network” that forms a “virtual power plant.” Households normally receive about $100 for joining the network, but instead they agreed to donate that money to the church for solar panels.

Costs from the entire project– headed by Maryland’s Mosaic Power– were minimal or nil for both the households and the church. The project is significant because it shows how strong the support for crowd-funding solar projects can be– even in the heart of coal country!

Praxia Partners’ initiative, Community Renewable Energy, believes that nonprofits, community groups, and community members can benefit from renewable power.

For decades, principals of Community Renewable Energy have dedicated themselves to the sustainable growth of nonprofits, partnering with dozens of organizations across the nation and establishing an impressive track record of managing complex projects, multiple incentives, grants, loans, and regulations.

As a Praxia Partners initiative, we’re dedicated to helping nonprofits meet their needs and the needs of their community through sustainable development and economic growth. Every Praxia Partners project is guided by the triple bottom line of social equity, prosperity, and environmental stewardship.

In the same way that a plant coverts sunlight into energy, your growing nonprofit can harness natural resources in order to flourish and establish stronger, deeper roots in your community.

About Holly

Holly Jensen is a writer and poet who has worked with nonprofits and businesses for over a decade. She also serves as editor of The Ghazal Page, an international literary journal.
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