Watch this: 50 years ago in Selma

In March 1965, thousands upon thousands of Americans gathered on the Edmund Pettus Bridge (named for the Grand Dragon of the Alabama Ku Klux Klan) and began a journey that still reverberates throughout the nation. Today, we revisit some remarkable footage from the march and reflect on how we still must continue to fight for equal opportunity for everyone. 

The documentary footage was captured and edited by Stefan Sharff.

Recently, President Barack Obama addressed leaders and community members on that  infamous bridge. He showed his admiration for those who faced jail time and violence while seeking equality.

Some experts from his speech:

[T]here are places and moments in America where this nation’s destiny has been decided.  Many are sites of war — Concord and Lexington, Appomattox, Gettysburg.  Others are sites that symbolize the daring of America’s character — Independence Hall and Seneca Falls, Kitty Hawk and Cape Canaveral.

Selma is such a place.  In one afternoon 50 years ago, so much of our turbulent history — the stain of slavery and anguish of civil war; the yoke of segregation and tyranny of Jim Crow; the death of four little girls in Birmingham; and the dream of a Baptist preacher — all that history met on this bridge.

[…] America is not some fragile thing.  We are large, in the words of Whitman, containing multitudes.  We are boisterous and diverse and full of energy, perpetually young in spirit.  That’s why someone like John Lewis at the ripe old age of 25 could lead a mighty march.

And that’s what the young people here today and listening all across the country must take away from this day.  You are America.  Unconstrained by habit and convention.  Unencumbered by what is, because you’re ready to seize what ought to be.

For everywhere in this country, there are first steps to be taken, there’s new ground to cover, there are more bridges to be crossed.  And it is you, the young and fearless at heart, the most diverse and educated generation in our history, who the nation is waiting to follow.

About Holly

Holly Jensen is a writer and poet who has worked with nonprofits and businesses for over a decade. She also serves as editor of The Ghazal Page, an international literary journal.
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